Acupuncture Therapy

Acupuncture is a diagnosis and treatment system of health care first studied and practiced by the Chinese some 3000 to 5000 years ago. The first record of Acupuncture is found in the 4,700 year old Huang Di Nei Jing (Yellow Emperor's Classic of Internal Medicine). This is said to be the oldest medical textbook in the world. It is said to have been written down from even earlier theories by Shen Nung, the father of Chinese Medicine. Shen Nung documented theories about circulation, pulse, and the heart over 4,000 years before European medicine had any concept about them.

As the basis of Acupuncture, Shen Nung theorized the body had an energy force running throughout it. This energy force is known as Qi (roughly pronounced Chee). The Qi consists of all essential life activities which include the spiritual, emotional, mental and the physical aspects of life. A person's health is influenced by the flow of Qi in the body, in combination with the universal forces of Yin and Yang . (I will discuss Yin and Yang a little later). If the flow of Qi is insufficient, unbalanced or interrupted, Yin and Yang become unbalanced, and illness may occur. Qi travels throughout the body along "Meridians" or special pathways. The Meridians, (or Channels), are the same on both sides of the body (paired). There are fourteen main meridians running vertically up and down the surface of the body. Out of these, there are twelve organ Meridians in each half of the body (remember they are in pairs). There are also two unpaired midline Meridians. The acupuncture points are specific locations where the Meridians come to the surface of the skin, and are easily accessible by "needling," Moxibustion, and Acupressure. The connections between them ensure there is an even circulation of Qi, a balance between Yin and Yang.

The concepts of Yin and Yang originate in ancient Chinese philosophy and metaphysics, which describes two primal opposing but complementary forces found in all things in the universe. Yin (Chinese: pinyin: yīn; literally "shady place, north slope (hill), south bank (river); cloudy, overcast") is the darker element; it is sad, passive, dark, feminine, downward-seeking, and corresponds to the night. Yang (yáng; "sunny place, south slope (hill), north bank (river); sunshine") is the brighter element; it is happy, active, light, masculine, upward-seeking and corresponds to the day. Yin is often symbolized by water, while Yang is symbolized by fire.

Yin (feminine, dark, passive force) and Yang (masculine, bright, active force) are descriptions of complementary opposites rather than absolutes. Any Yin/Yang dichotomy can be seen as its opposite when viewed from another perspective. The categorisation is seen as one of convenience. Most forces in nature can be seen as having Yin and Yang states, and the two are usually in movement rather than held in absolute stasis.

The acupuncturist seeks to identify conditions of disharmony or imbalances of Qi (body energy). When imbalances are present the body cannot function and/or heal properly. Using sophisticated means of computer analysis (EMI) Electro Meridian Imaging, Dr. Faro can accurately measure the energy patterns of each meridian and treat specific acupuncture points using needles, laser, or electric stimulation. These treatments work to balance energy in the meridian and thus the body. Chinese herbs may also be used to aid in the recovery. Acupuncture is safe and effective and can be utilized for a variety of complaints or conditions including arthritis, headaches, sinusitis, nausea, tennis elbow, carpal tunnel, spinal, shoulder, knee pain, immune stimulation and more.

Contact Us
Office Hours
Monday:8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday:8:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Wednesday:8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday:Closed
Friday:8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday:Closed
Sunday:Closed